" I'm a Leonard. Our family has this curse. It's kind of like Murphy's Law- things are always going to go wrong, before they come right. "

Twenty Something. Born and raised in Africa, lived in the sweltering summers of Melbourne, Australia, and then the freezing winters of Halifax, Canada. On the endless journey to find a place to call home again. Traveling the world, with nothing but the money in my pocket and an ice cold glass of wine. This is where I write travel advice, musings and the occasional angry vent. Feedback is always welcome. Drop me a line if you have any queries.

email: rogzleonard@gmail.com pinterest.com/prestikgremlin

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Posts tagged "winter"
A Guide to Surviving Winter (For those of us who aren’t from Winter Countries)
For those of you who were born in this wintery wonderland, please ignore this post. For those of you who, like me, hail from a warmer climate and were brought up believing Canadian winters are a picturesque “christmas card” kind of thing, read on:
1. Onions have layers, so should you
In Melbourne, for example, winter isn’t a huge deal. Yeah, it gets a bit nippy, and the rain is a bummer, but for the most part it’s bearable. Melbourne winters are akin to mild Canadian Autumns. It’s easy to look stylish, because a reasonable coat and a decent brolly is all you need. In Canada- this is not the case. When the weather drops below zero (and I mean way way below zero) you’re going to need more than a nice coat. In Halifax, add the fact that you’re most likely going to face chilly weather with bits of ice and rain and snow all swirling about, and you need to think about waterproofing your layers too. Fashion goes out the window, with most people resembling Russian peasants crossed with arctic explorers. Thermal vests, jumpers, cardigans, infinity scarves tucked into your jacket, a warm jacket and then a toasty raincoat or coat, thick mittens, a full beanie (or Toque, as the locals call it), ear muffs, and sunglasses if the snow glare is really bad. And that’s just a normal chilly day. You might look like a puffy school kid, but the alternative is having your ears freeze off, so choice is yours.
2. Snow is pretty, sleet is not
Before I moved to Canada, I had the same idea about snow as pretty much everyone else from the Southern Hemisphere: it’s pretty and white and soft and heavenly. I was wrong.
When snow is falling, it’s beautiful, don’t get me wrong. Downtown, for a brief little while it’s like the whole city becomes this sleepy town covered in a blanket of white. But then pedestrians trudge it into the ground, plows push it into mounds which grey with dirt and polution, and it goes from being a white blanket to a grey and miserable mess.
In Halifax, which has milder weather than most of inland Canada, barring maybe Toronto which is quite south, snow doesn’t last long. After maybe a few days of snow, the weather goes up, the snow turns to slush, and next thing you’re sloshing your way to work through puddles of what I can only describe as grey coloured Slurpee.
3. Black Ice is terrifying. The invisible enemy, if you will.
Here’s the thing about Halifax, and maybe other parts of Canada, maybe? It snows, it’s pretty, then it gets trudged into compact snow on the pavement by pedestrians, the weather warms up, it rains a bit, covering the snow in rain, maybe even melting some of it, forming puddles; then the weather drops again, sometimes by 15 degrees in the span of a few hours, and suddenly all of the rain and puddles freeze, and turn into solid, slippery ice. So basically one minute you’re walking through a snowy winter wonderland, the next you’re slipping on ice and cracking you head open on the road/pavement. I’m not even kidding, it’s terrifying. If you’re here long enough, you will definitely hear stories, or even slip once or twice yourself. Be careful. Buy those thingamabobs you put on your shoes if you want, but don’t slip- because I’m almost certain basic travel insurance won’t cover it.
4. Do as the locals do, but with a pinch of salt
My friends are Canadian, and from even colder cities than Halifax (which isn’t saying much because pretty much everywhere in Canada, except maybe Vancouver, is colder than Halifax) they are used to winter, in fact, you could say they thrive in it. There is a lot you can learn from friends and canuck locals- from how to dress appropriately, where to buy winter goods at a better price, how to salt your driveway and pavement properly, the best soup recipe’s, etc. But one thing you need to remember is that you aren’t Canadian. Whilst your Canuck friends might be able to wear a tshirt and flip flops when it’s -1 outside, you probably can’t do the same without catching a nasty cold and cursing profusely into your third cup of Lemsip. Another thing to bare in mind is that your winterized friends mean no harm when they tease you for constantly saying “My god, it is so cold,” or when you are the one wearing several more layers than anyone else. They’re used to the extreme cold, but you aren’t, and that’s okay. Enjoy the novelty of a snowy winter before it wears off, and just remember, when they visit you in Australia one day, it will be you having the last laugh as they melt in the scorching Southern Hemisphere heatwaves. ;)

A Guide to Surviving Winter (For those of us who aren’t from Winter Countries)

For those of you who were born in this wintery wonderland, please ignore this post. For those of you who, like me, hail from a warmer climate and were brought up believing Canadian winters are a picturesque “christmas card” kind of thing, read on:

1. Onions have layers, so should you

In Melbourne, for example, winter isn’t a huge deal. Yeah, it gets a bit nippy, and the rain is a bummer, but for the most part it’s bearable. Melbourne winters are akin to mild Canadian Autumns. It’s easy to look stylish, because a reasonable coat and a decent brolly is all you need. In Canada- this is not the case. When the weather drops below zero (and I mean way way below zero) you’re going to need more than a nice coat. In Halifax, add the fact that you’re most likely going to face chilly weather with bits of ice and rain and snow all swirling about, and you need to think about waterproofing your layers too. Fashion goes out the window, with most people resembling Russian peasants crossed with arctic explorers. Thermal vests, jumpers, cardigans, infinity scarves tucked into your jacket, a warm jacket and then a toasty raincoat or coat, thick mittens, a full beanie (or Toque, as the locals call it), ear muffs, and sunglasses if the snow glare is really bad. And that’s just a normal chilly day. You might look like a puffy school kid, but the alternative is having your ears freeze off, so choice is yours.

2. Snow is pretty, sleet is not

Before I moved to Canada, I had the same idea about snow as pretty much everyone else from the Southern Hemisphere: it’s pretty and white and soft and heavenly. I was wrong.

When snow is falling, it’s beautiful, don’t get me wrong. Downtown, for a brief little while it’s like the whole city becomes this sleepy town covered in a blanket of white. But then pedestrians trudge it into the ground, plows push it into mounds which grey with dirt and polution, and it goes from being a white blanket to a grey and miserable mess.

In Halifax, which has milder weather than most of inland Canada, barring maybe Toronto which is quite south, snow doesn’t last long. After maybe a few days of snow, the weather goes up, the snow turns to slush, and next thing you’re sloshing your way to work through puddles of what I can only describe as grey coloured Slurpee.

3. Black Ice is terrifying. The invisible enemy, if you will.

Here’s the thing about Halifax, and maybe other parts of Canada, maybe? It snows, it’s pretty, then it gets trudged into compact snow on the pavement by pedestrians, the weather warms up, it rains a bit, covering the snow in rain, maybe even melting some of it, forming puddles; then the weather drops again, sometimes by 15 degrees in the span of a few hours, and suddenly all of the rain and puddles freeze, and turn into solid, slippery ice. So basically one minute you’re walking through a snowy winter wonderland, the next you’re slipping on ice and cracking you head open on the road/pavement. I’m not even kidding, it’s terrifying. If you’re here long enough, you will definitely hear stories, or even slip once or twice yourself. Be careful. Buy those thingamabobs you put on your shoes if you want, but don’t slip- because I’m almost certain basic travel insurance won’t cover it.

4. Do as the locals do, but with a pinch of salt

My friends are Canadian, and from even colder cities than Halifax (which isn’t saying much because pretty much everywhere in Canada, except maybe Vancouver, is colder than Halifax) they are used to winter, in fact, you could say they thrive in it. There is a lot you can learn from friends and canuck locals- from how to dress appropriately, where to buy winter goods at a better price, how to salt your driveway and pavement properly, the best soup recipe’s, etc. But one thing you need to remember is that you aren’t Canadian. Whilst your Canuck friends might be able to wear a tshirt and flip flops when it’s -1 outside, you probably can’t do the same without catching a nasty cold and cursing profusely into your third cup of Lemsip. Another thing to bare in mind is that your winterized friends mean no harm when they tease you for constantly saying “My god, it is so cold,” or when you are the one wearing several more layers than anyone else. They’re used to the extreme cold, but you aren’t, and that’s okay. Enjoy the novelty of a snowy winter before it wears off, and just remember, when they visit you in Australia one day, it will be you having the last laugh as they melt in the scorching Southern Hemisphere heatwaves. ;)

Today:
Today I am happy that I own a decent pair of rainboots (extra happy that these have polka dots on them)
I am glad that I went to the library and took out 6 books instead of one, so now I have plenty read during the rainstorm.
I am contemplating adding the raspberry and poppy dressing I found to everything I cook because it is delicious.
I am reading The Perks of Being a Wallflower (because it has to be even better than the film).
Today is a good day.
Even if it’s pouring and windy outside.

Today:

Today I am happy that I own a decent pair of rainboots (extra happy that these have polka dots on them)

I am glad that I went to the library and took out 6 books instead of one, so now I have plenty read during the rainstorm.

I am contemplating adding the raspberry and poppy dressing I found to everything I cook because it is delicious.

I am reading The Perks of Being a Wallflower (because it has to be even better than the film).

Today is a good day.

Even if it’s pouring and windy outside.

This Girl is a Summer Girl (Or My Annual Round-Up of Everything I Love About Summer)
It’s nearing winter in Halifax again. (So soon, it’s insane!) and although I think I’m more prepared this time round for the chilly weather, I have come to the definite conclusion that I need to live somewhere where the summers are endless and the weather stays warm.
It’s not that I don’t love the change of seasons. It’s fascinating how the weather here can be so neatly divided into four picturesque quarters, and that with each one the scene changes entirely, from rain and flowers, to hot sunny afternoons, to shades of orange leaves to snowwy peaks; but I’m not accustomed to this, and I don’t think I’ll ever truly adjust.
I’m a southern hemisphere girl. I grew up in towns where the Summers sprawled over months; where the heat soared well into the unreasonable digits. I’m used to Thundershowers not meaning rainfall. I’m used to Christmas lunch being served outside; to New Years’ Day lounging by the pool.
I might not be the most tanned person (and by that I mean that I happen to be bordering on translucent) but I love the sun. I love everything about it- and the problem with winter is that the sun is hardly ever out. I can’t stand how dark it is almost all the time. Maybe in my previous life I was a bear or something, because truth be told, when the temp drops, and the sun starts setting early in the afternoon, all I want to do is hibernate under my duvet covers until Spring comes again.
Sorry Canada, this is one thing you and I aren’t ever going to see eye to eye on.

This Girl is a Summer Girl (Or My Annual Round-Up of Everything I Love About Summer)

It’s nearing winter in Halifax again. (So soon, it’s insane!) and although I think I’m more prepared this time round for the chilly weather, I have come to the definite conclusion that I need to live somewhere where the summers are endless and the weather stays warm.

It’s not that I don’t love the change of seasons. It’s fascinating how the weather here can be so neatly divided into four picturesque quarters, and that with each one the scene changes entirely, from rain and flowers, to hot sunny afternoons, to shades of orange leaves to snowwy peaks; but I’m not accustomed to this, and I don’t think I’ll ever truly adjust.

I’m a southern hemisphere girl. I grew up in towns where the Summers sprawled over months; where the heat soared well into the unreasonable digits. I’m used to Thundershowers not meaning rainfall. I’m used to Christmas lunch being served outside; to New Years’ Day lounging by the pool.

I might not be the most tanned person (and by that I mean that I happen to be bordering on translucent) but I love the sun. I love everything about it- and the problem with winter is that the sun is hardly ever out. I can’t stand how dark it is almost all the time. Maybe in my previous life I was a bear or something, because truth be told, when the temp drops, and the sun starts setting early in the afternoon, all I want to do is hibernate under my duvet covers until Spring comes again.

Sorry Canada, this is one thing you and I aren’t ever going to see eye to eye on.

I spent my first Fall (Autumn) in Canada. I managed to check off almost everything on the “Things to do in Fall” traditional list:

host a Thanksgiving dinner party.

Eat copious amounts of pumpkin pie.

Take moody instagram photos of orange coloured fallen leaves.

Drink pumpkin spice/ salted caramel / apple flavoured coffees.

Dress up and eat candy for halloween.

While I cannot deny that this season really is beautiful, I’m not particularily ready for the cold winter ahead….

Next stop- Calgary (Or “How to annoy everyone with Cool Runnings references”)

When I left Vancouver in a flurry of halloween costumes and packing my bags hungover, I had some tredipation about my next short stop: Calgary.

Why? well I am a fan of the 80s classic, Cool Runnings, a film in which a group of Jamaicans brave the wintery weather of Canada to partake in the Olympics (If you haven’t seen the film- what have you been doing all of these years!) and in this film they emphasis just how gosh-darn cold it is in Calgary.

They weren’t kidding, either. As I made my way to the exit, the snowfall caught my eye. It was the first snow I had seen since my arrival in Canada. I was so in awe I completely forgot that I was just wearing a light cardigan. I strolled right through the doors and BAM! was hit with the exceptionally chilly air. I hurriedly ran back inside and retrieved my coat, gloves, scarf, hat and ear muffs. Passers by looked at me with bewilderment. I guess to them the weather was “mild” or “not that bad for this time of year”. I couldn’t help but laugh out loud because I was reminded of a similiar scene from the film, where the Jamaicans departed from the same airport, and had the same reaction to the freezing temperature. (Note: laughing out loud to yourself, when you have already attracted attention for quirkily hurling on every warm item of clothing you can find- just causes more amused onlookers to give you concerned stares).

I didn’t stay in Calgary, I caught a coach directly to Banff, a small mountain town nearby. This isn’t something I really regret. Calgary, as I observed it through the brief drive through town, was just a mishmash of grey buildings, grey skies, and white blankets of snow. The scene was meloncholy at best. I won’t make this my final judgement- perhaps it is more inviting in the warmer months?

One good thing that did come out of my brief encounter with Calgary was that I decided to download (ahem, I mean purchase legally) Cool Runnings, and it was just great watching the film and laughing at all of its hilarious anecdotes once again.

Another thing I’ve noticed about snow:

I am aware that my blog seems to be preoccupied with posts about the weather, and for this I am sorry. But hey, I am still enjoying what will be my first ever real winter, and it is awe-inspiring at times, no?

One thing I have recently learnt is that in downtown, the snow makes the sky orange at night. This is caused by the orange glow of street lights reflecting on the falling snow, and means that even in the late hours of the night, the sky is a murky brilliant shade of amber. A few weeks ago, when I first happened upon this, by peering out of my window one insomnia ridden night, I freaked out. My first instinctual thought was “Oh crap, another fire!”

See, living in rural Australia meant that there was seldom fog, and most certainly no snow. When the sky burned a feiry orange, it was usually safe to assume the ground burned below.

After overcoming my initial shock, I was taken aback by how eerie it all was. Orange skies, white snow, and the swirling flurries blanketing the city streets.


 

(via blua)

It’s nearing spring.

I still haven’t learnt how to make a fire.

That’s going to hopefully change, though. I’m picturing a lot of nights camping on the shores of Nova Scotia, snuggling up to a fire.

yes, lots of nights.

(via sxsn)

Especially on a cold winter morning. 

Especially on a cold winter morning. 

(via misswallflower)

typeverything:

typeverything.com Toronto Map (by Linzie Hunter)

Toronto. I’d really like to go back- for all the wrong reasons. :) 

fromme-toyou:

A quiet autumn rain… 

fromme-toyou:

Hope you all have a wonderful Thanksgiving, From Me To You

‘
The History of Cinemagraphs
A Cinemagraph is an image that contains within itself a living moment that allows a glimpse of time to be experienced and preserved endlessly. Visual Graphics Artist Kevin Burg began experimenting with the .gif format in this style in 2009 but it wasn’t until he partnered with photographer Jamie Beck to cover NYFW that Cinemagraphs were born. Marrying original content photography with the desire to communicate more to the viewer birthed the cinemagraph process. Starting in-camera, the artists take a traditional photograph and combine a living moment into the image through the isolated animation of multiple frames. To quote supermodel Coco Rocha “it’s more than a photo but not quite a video”. Beck and Burg named the process “Cinemagraphs” for their cinematic quality while maintaining at its soul the principles of traditional photography. Launched virally through social media platforms Twitter and Tumblr, both the style of imagery and terminology has become a class of its own. The creative duo are looking forward to exploring future display technologies for gallery settings as well as pushing this new art form and communication process as the best way to capture a moment in time or create a true living portrait in our digital age while embracing our need to communicate visually and share instantly. Jamie Beck and Kevin Burg reside in New York City.’
[Note: These pictures are absolutely awe-inspiring. If you would like to check out more, which I would recommend, click here or for Jamie’s personal blog and more photographic awesomeness, click here.]

fromme-toyou:

Hope you all have a wonderful Thanksgiving, From Me To You

The History of Cinemagraphs


A Cinemagraph is an image that contains within itself a living moment that allows a glimpse of time to be experienced and preserved endlessly. 

Visual Graphics Artist Kevin Burg began experimenting with the .gif format in this style in 2009 but it wasn’t until he partnered with photographer Jamie Beck to cover NYFW that Cinemagraphs were born. Marrying original content photography with the desire to communicate more to the viewer birthed the cinemagraph process. Starting in-camera, the artists take a traditional photograph and combine a living moment into the image through the isolated animation of multiple frames. To quote supermodel Coco Rocha “it’s more than a photo but not quite a video”. 

Beck and Burg named the process “Cinemagraphs” for their cinematic quality while maintaining at its soul the principles of traditional photography. Launched virally through social media platforms Twitter and Tumblr, both the style of imagery and terminology has become a class of its own. The creative duo are looking forward to exploring future display technologies for gallery settings as well as pushing this new art form and communication process as the best way to capture a moment in time or create a true living portrait in our digital age while embracing our need to communicate visually and share instantly. 

Jamie Beck and Kevin Burg reside in New York City.’

[Note: These pictures are absolutely awe-inspiring. If you would like to check out more, which I would recommend, click here or for Jamie’s personal blog and more photographic awesomeness, click here.]

rememberwhenwewere:

Little Red Dress (by Jennifer Grace)

 The over the knee tights, a new trend I have seen pop up, everywhere.  Mostly on my new favourite website to procrastinate on: LookBook.nu. I love it. But I wonder if I can pull it off? 

Things I would like to do during my winter escape:

As you know, I am headed off to Toronto for a two week winter adventure in January. I am overwhelmed with nerves and excitement. Of course, one of the things I am most looking forward to is getting a chance to see a real winter, with snow and everything.

I have decided the only way to make the most of this winter wonderland is by ensuring I do all of the following “wintery” things, however cliché they may seem.

-         - Build a snow man. Complete with top had and a carrot nose.

-         - Make snow angels

-          -Have a snow ball fight

-          -Sit at a window with the snow gently falling on the pane, pondering life and staring absent minded into the distance.

-         - Learn how to make a fire for the fireplace

-         - Re-enact a scene from Fargo “oh, Margie!”

-         - Find and buy a groovy pair of wellington gum boots

-        -  Eat roast chestnuts from a street vendor

-         - Send people snowy town scene postcards

-         - Eat a warm winter pudding

-          -Get a cheesy romantic kissing in the snow photo

I am somewhat ashamed by my unabashed tourist status when it comes to all of this- but hey, I have never seen snow before. Give me a break! 

:)

(via potterforprez)

Every year I write about how I wish I could have a “white” Christmas. This year I won’t. Instead, I am going to write about what makes my African and summer Christmas’s the best.
Every December, since before I can remember, my family has gathered together to celebrate Christmas down at the coast. Mum would pull out all of the spare linen and mattresses and my house would be filled to the brim with aunts and cousins and grandparents and crying babies and awkwardly shy new boyfriends or girlfriends of cousins, bravely spending their first Christmas with my family.
At 5am on Christmas morning, just as the sun starts to peak out beyond the horizon (Christmas in the summer means an early start…) the youngest of us would wake in excitement and run through the house declaring “Santa came! Santa came! Presents for everyone!” and we would all (somewhat begrudgingly) make our way to the living room, where beneath an enormous Christmas tree lay hundreds of perfectly- and not so perfectly- wrapped gifts.
Being hot and humid as it is during the summer months, we would not leave out milk and cookies for Santa. Instead a refreshing beer and a slice of my grandmother’s famous banana loaf were left on a porcelain plate near the windowsill instead.
All morning we would slave away in the kitchen preparing a huge feast. Turkey, chicken, gammon glazed in honey, sweet potato pie, roast veg, grilled potatoes, fresh salads, pasta salads, cold meats, calamari, and anything else you could possibly think of made its way to our Christmas lunch table.
As it would normally be hot and sunny, we would decorate our outdoor yard with fairy lights and umbrellas and have our feast in the garden. Laden with hundreds of dishes, the table would also groan under the weight of my mum’s finest silverware, Christmas crackers and plenty of wine and ice cold lemonade.
Afterwards, we would gather up our dishes, rub our full bellies and relax in the shade, or take a nap in the sun. The Cricket would always be playing in the background and the house would lull into a peaceful and fulfilled silence.
I may not get snow men and warm fireplaces to go along with my Christmas, but I love it all the same.
So to everyone celebrating a summer Christmas, I hope it is merry and warm and wonderful.

Every year I write about how I wish I could have a “white” Christmas. This year I won’t. Instead, I am going to write about what makes my African and summer Christmas’s the best.

Every December, since before I can remember, my family has gathered together to celebrate Christmas down at the coast. Mum would pull out all of the spare linen and mattresses and my house would be filled to the brim with aunts and cousins and grandparents and crying babies and awkwardly shy new boyfriends or girlfriends of cousins, bravely spending their first Christmas with my family.

At 5am on Christmas morning, just as the sun starts to peak out beyond the horizon (Christmas in the summer means an early start…) the youngest of us would wake in excitement and run through the house declaring “Santa came! Santa came! Presents for everyone!” and we would all (somewhat begrudgingly) make our way to the living room, where beneath an enormous Christmas tree lay hundreds of perfectly- and not so perfectly- wrapped gifts.

Being hot and humid as it is during the summer months, we would not leave out milk and cookies for Santa. Instead a refreshing beer and a slice of my grandmother’s famous banana loaf were left on a porcelain plate near the windowsill instead.

All morning we would slave away in the kitchen preparing a huge feast. Turkey, chicken, gammon glazed in honey, sweet potato pie, roast veg, grilled potatoes, fresh salads, pasta salads, cold meats, calamari, and anything else you could possibly think of made its way to our Christmas lunch table.

As it would normally be hot and sunny, we would decorate our outdoor yard with fairy lights and umbrellas and have our feast in the garden. Laden with hundreds of dishes, the table would also groan under the weight of my mum’s finest silverware, Christmas crackers and plenty of wine and ice cold lemonade.

Afterwards, we would gather up our dishes, rub our full bellies and relax in the shade, or take a nap in the sun. The Cricket would always be playing in the background and the house would lull into a peaceful and fulfilled silence.

I may not get snow men and warm fireplaces to go along with my Christmas, but I love it all the same.

So to everyone celebrating a summer Christmas, I hope it is merry and warm and wonderful.

(via choosingfire-deactivated2013061)

In January, I am going to Toronto for 2 weeks, to visit a close friend, and see the winter sights. I am very excited, but also quite nervous.
Living in Summer, my entire life, I have never been exposed to a true winter. (I have said this countless times before, I know). In Australia, it has always been easy to spot the European tourists. They often don’t really know what to wear in the hot desert-like weather. They get their knowledge from outdated cliché movies, and often you can spot them in Velcro sandals and giant beige Stetsons- what they deem appropriate summer attire.
I am worried I will be the same, but in snow gear. I don’t know what shoes are waterproof but also fashionable. I have no idea how puffy my parka needs to be. Surely those girls in Gossip Girl freeze in their thin little coats and white tights? Isn’t it below zero? They must  all want to wear super warm space suits?
I have decided to take a deep breath and just hope for the best. Simple black wellies, greys and whites. And if all else fails, enough wine to keep me warm enough, and happy enough, not to care about the cold.

In January, I am going to Toronto for 2 weeks, to visit a close friend, and see the winter sights. I am very excited, but also quite nervous.

Living in Summer, my entire life, I have never been exposed to a true winter. (I have said this countless times before, I know). In Australia, it has always been easy to spot the European tourists. They often don’t really know what to wear in the hot desert-like weather. They get their knowledge from outdated cliché movies, and often you can spot them in Velcro sandals and giant beige Stetsons- what they deem appropriate summer attire.

I am worried I will be the same, but in snow gear. I don’t know what shoes are waterproof but also fashionable. I have no idea how puffy my parka needs to be. Surely those girls in Gossip Girl freeze in their thin little coats and white tights? Isn’t it below zero? They must  all want to wear super warm space suits?

I have decided to take a deep breath and just hope for the best. Simple black wellies, greys and whites. And if all else fails, enough wine to keep me warm enough, and happy enough, not to care about the cold.

(via emilygraceisadisgrace-deactivat)