Hostel Living Part 4: Goodbyes are never easy
Where was I? yup, it was nearing the end of March, and it was finally time to say goodbye to the hostel I had made my home for the better part of five months. While I must admit it was a sad day, saying goodbye to my crooked little room on the third floor, I was excited to move into my own place (well- sort of, it’s a sublet) and to finally have a long, hot bubble bath without anyone interrupting me or whatnot.
Living in a hostel has been one of the strangest experiences I’ve had. It has its ups (Parties, great place to meet people, never a quiet moment or a dull day, etc.) but it also has its downs. One of the biggest, and hardest things I had to deal with when living in a hostel was constantly having to bode farewell to new friends I had made.
See, when you live in hostel, there is that strong sense of temporary ignorance, where, if only for the most fleeting of moments, you can easily forget that you’re a traveller, and that the people you have met are too. You begin to treat them as lifelong friends, housemates that you know all too well. They’re the ones eager to explore the new city with you, discuss cultural differences with you, and go halvsies on that bottle of wine. The bonds you can make over a matter of a few short days feel like they’re unbreakable: and then you’re reminded that it is only temporary, and soon enough you’re waving goodbye to your new friend, as they run for the airport shuttle bus, or drive off on their next adventure…
Some of the friends I made during my stay have disapeared without so much as an email. Sadly, all they are now are distant memories of a few fun moments lost in the past. Other’s have made the effort to stay in touch, and will no doubt be people I will see again, somewhere else in the world, or maybe even in this small town.
One thing is for sure though, it gets quite tiresome, this travelling gig. I’m starting to hate the goodbyes.

Hostel Living Part 4: Goodbyes are never easy

Where was I? yup, it was nearing the end of March, and it was finally time to say goodbye to the hostel I had made my home for the better part of five months. While I must admit it was a sad day, saying goodbye to my crooked little room on the third floor, I was excited to move into my own place (well- sort of, it’s a sublet) and to finally have a long, hot bubble bath without anyone interrupting me or whatnot.

Living in a hostel has been one of the strangest experiences I’ve had. It has its ups (Parties, great place to meet people, never a quiet moment or a dull day, etc.) but it also has its downs. One of the biggest, and hardest things I had to deal with when living in a hostel was constantly having to bode farewell to new friends I had made.

See, when you live in hostel, there is that strong sense of temporary ignorance, where, if only for the most fleeting of moments, you can easily forget that you’re a traveller, and that the people you have met are too. You begin to treat them as lifelong friends, housemates that you know all too well. They’re the ones eager to explore the new city with you, discuss cultural differences with you, and go halvsies on that bottle of wine. The bonds you can make over a matter of a few short days feel like they’re unbreakable: and then you’re reminded that it is only temporary, and soon enough you’re waving goodbye to your new friend, as they run for the airport shuttle bus, or drive off on their next adventure…

Some of the friends I made during my stay have disapeared without so much as an email. Sadly, all they are now are distant memories of a few fun moments lost in the past. Other’s have made the effort to stay in touch, and will no doubt be people I will see again, somewhere else in the world, or maybe even in this small town.

One thing is for sure though, it gets quite tiresome, this travelling gig. I’m starting to hate the goodbyes.

(Source: neecaxoxo)

I am missing summer. I know I sound like a broken record at this point- but winter has been far too long for me this year. From snow in Toronto, to cold miserable greyness in Melbourne-to a frosty season in Halifax. I’m DONE!
I want road trips, warm patches of sun, afternoon naps, lunches in the garden, ice cold beer, day trips to the beach, campfires, and sunsets at 10pm.
I want summer!

I am missing summer. I know I sound like a broken record at this point- but winter has been far too long for me this year. From snow in Toronto, to cold miserable greyness in Melbourne-to a frosty season in Halifax. I’m DONE!

I want road trips, warm patches of sun, afternoon naps, lunches in the garden, ice cold beer, day trips to the beach, campfires, and sunsets at 10pm.

I want summer!

(Source: thisiswhatmakesusfree, via teachingliteracy)

Starting over is never easy. It’s an exciting but exhausting feat. I’ve partied my way across three continents only to find myself unemployed and worrisome in a small coastal town nearly in the middle of nowhere. Sure, I have a roof over my head and a few interviews lined up… but I have to admit I’m feeling more than a little lost.
If I could, I’d steal one of the small boats tied to the docks, at the harbour nearby. I’d sail off without a word. If I could. 

Starting over is never easy. It’s an exciting but exhausting feat. I’ve partied my way across three continents only to find myself unemployed and worrisome in a small coastal town nearly in the middle of nowhere. Sure, I have a roof over my head and a few interviews lined up… but I have to admit I’m feeling more than a little lost.

If I could, I’d steal one of the small boats tied to the docks, at the harbour nearby. I’d sail off without a word. If I could. 

(via muse)

It’s always raining in this city. Sigh… 

It’s always raining in this city. Sigh… 

(via darklamb)

fromme-toyou:

Hope you all have a wonderful Thanksgiving, From Me To You

‘
The History of Cinemagraphs
A Cinemagraph is an image that contains within itself a living moment that allows a glimpse of time to be experienced and preserved endlessly. Visual Graphics Artist Kevin Burg began experimenting with the .gif format in this style in 2009 but it wasn’t until he partnered with photographer Jamie Beck to cover NYFW that Cinemagraphs were born. Marrying original content photography with the desire to communicate more to the viewer birthed the cinemagraph process. Starting in-camera, the artists take a traditional photograph and combine a living moment into the image through the isolated animation of multiple frames. To quote supermodel Coco Rocha “it’s more than a photo but not quite a video”. Beck and Burg named the process “Cinemagraphs” for their cinematic quality while maintaining at its soul the principles of traditional photography. Launched virally through social media platforms Twitter and Tumblr, both the style of imagery and terminology has become a class of its own. The creative duo are looking forward to exploring future display technologies for gallery settings as well as pushing this new art form and communication process as the best way to capture a moment in time or create a true living portrait in our digital age while embracing our need to communicate visually and share instantly. Jamie Beck and Kevin Burg reside in New York City.’
[Note: These pictures are absolutely awe-inspiring. If you would like to check out more, which I would recommend, click here or for Jamie’s personal blog and more photographic awesomeness, click here.]

fromme-toyou:

Hope you all have a wonderful Thanksgiving, From Me To You

The History of Cinemagraphs


A Cinemagraph is an image that contains within itself a living moment that allows a glimpse of time to be experienced and preserved endlessly. 

Visual Graphics Artist Kevin Burg began experimenting with the .gif format in this style in 2009 but it wasn’t until he partnered with photographer Jamie Beck to cover NYFW that Cinemagraphs were born. Marrying original content photography with the desire to communicate more to the viewer birthed the cinemagraph process. Starting in-camera, the artists take a traditional photograph and combine a living moment into the image through the isolated animation of multiple frames. To quote supermodel Coco Rocha “it’s more than a photo but not quite a video”. 

Beck and Burg named the process “Cinemagraphs” for their cinematic quality while maintaining at its soul the principles of traditional photography. Launched virally through social media platforms Twitter and Tumblr, both the style of imagery and terminology has become a class of its own. The creative duo are looking forward to exploring future display technologies for gallery settings as well as pushing this new art form and communication process as the best way to capture a moment in time or create a true living portrait in our digital age while embracing our need to communicate visually and share instantly. 

Jamie Beck and Kevin Burg reside in New York City.’

[Note: These pictures are absolutely awe-inspiring. If you would like to check out more, which I would recommend, click here or for Jamie’s personal blog and more photographic awesomeness, click here.]

(Source: annstreetstudio)

I have stumbled upon my new favourite way to procrastinate. Meet Pinterest: The online pinboard.
It’s like a digital Vision- Board. You select pictures and links and idea’s from all over the internet (and your own browser) and you pin them onto specifically categorised boards, for all of your friends and other “pinners” to see. Sound a little redundant? Well- it can actually be kind of useful.
I am horrible at remembering things- it’s one of the reasons I love writing lists, and keeping a day planner packed full of magazine cut-outs and scrawls of information. Pinterest lets me do all of this digitally. Also- don’t you just hate it when you find a great website and can’t find it later on? For example wasting your time scrolling through your search history trying to find that obscure named website that sold those gorgeous heels at half price? Pinterest lets you add a pin to your toolbar, which allows you to pin pictures from any website to your Pin Board. It also keeps the website link and lets you type any additional information. Nifty, Huh?
Needless to say- I’m hooked (or pinned?) I have boards about neat hairstyling ideas; boards about travel plans, such as hotel information, great locations to visit, good websites about travel info; I have boards about the latest fashions; and I even have a few boards for way way way in the future (see- weddingspiration and adorbs Pinboards).
It’s a great way to stay organised, and an even greater way to kill time. It’s like Twitter with Pictures- only better.

[Note: if you would like to check out my pinterest, or create your own, Click here.] 

I have stumbled upon my new favourite way to procrastinate. Meet Pinterest: The online pinboard.

It’s like a digital Vision- Board. You select pictures and links and idea’s from all over the internet (and your own browser) and you pin them onto specifically categorised boards, for all of your friends and other “pinners” to see. Sound a little redundant? Well- it can actually be kind of useful.

I am horrible at remembering things- it’s one of the reasons I love writing lists, and keeping a day planner packed full of magazine cut-outs and scrawls of information. Pinterest lets me do all of this digitally. Also- don’t you just hate it when you find a great website and can’t find it later on? For example wasting your time scrolling through your search history trying to find that obscure named website that sold those gorgeous heels at half price? Pinterest lets you add a pin to your toolbar, which allows you to pin pictures from any website to your Pin Board. It also keeps the website link and lets you type any additional information. Nifty, Huh?

Needless to say- I’m hooked (or pinned?) I have boards about neat hairstyling ideas; boards about travel plans, such as hotel information, great locations to visit, good websites about travel info; I have boards about the latest fashions; and I even have a few boards for way way way in the future (see- weddingspiration and adorbs Pinboards).

It’s a great way to stay organised, and an even greater way to kill time. It’s like Twitter with Pictures- only better.

[Note: if you would like to check out my pinterest, or create your own, Click here.] 

ckck:

Seems like IKEA are really shaking things up this year. In addition to the previously announced TV set, they’re also going to release a digital camera made of cardboard called Knäppa (“Snap”). It’ll hold 40 photographs at a time and plugs directly into your USB port. While it’s not the prettiest camera the world has ever seen, I do love the idea of a screen-less digital camera that brings people back to the wait-and-see days of film.

(via fuckyeahbookarts)

take note. 

take note. 

(Source: birdbath-ed, via colouration)

fuckyeahbookarts:

artpixie:

Handmade Paper by Kiss the Groom

I gotta try this sometime!

fuckyeahbookarts:

artpixie:

Handmade Paper by Kiss the Groom

I gotta try this sometime!

doubledaybooks:

Fantastic and fantastical book photos by Joel Robinson

(via fuckyeahbookarts)

When it comes to relationships, I don’t ask for a lot.
I just want someone to be there for me, when things aren’t going so great.
I want someone who will laugh at my mistakes rather than criticize me for them.
I want someone I can share a laugh with over a few beers, without having to worry about how I look or what I say.
I want someone to wake up to; to fall asleep with; and all the little things in between.
Is that too much?
[Note:  if they’re a great shag and can make good coffee that’s an added bonus.] 

When it comes to relationships, I don’t ask for a lot.

I just want someone to be there for me, when things aren’t going so great.

I want someone who will laugh at my mistakes rather than criticize me for them.

I want someone I can share a laugh with over a few beers, without having to worry about how I look or what I say.

I want someone to wake up to; to fall asleep with; and all the little things in between.

Is that too much?

[Note:  if they’re a great shag and can make good coffee that’s an added bonus.] 

(Source: pbpizzle)

This is a piece by Douglas Adams, Which I had to reblog. Utterly wonderful concept on flying: 

There is an art, it says, or rather, a knack to flying. The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss. Pick a nice day, [The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy] suggests, and try it.
The first part is easy. All it requires is simply the ability to throw yourself forward with all your weight, and the willingness not to mind that it’s going to hurt.
That is, it’s going to hurt if you fail to miss the ground. Most people fail to miss the ground, and if they are really trying properly, the likelihood is that they will fail to miss it fairly hard.
Clearly, it is the second part, the missing, which presents the difficulties.
One problem is that you have to miss the ground accidentally. It’s no good deliberately intending to miss the ground because you won’t. You have to have your attention suddenly distracted by something else when you’re halfway there, so that you are no longer thinking about falling, or about the ground, or about how much it’s going to hurt if you fail to miss it.
It is notoriously difficult to prize your attention away from these three things during the split second you have at your disposal. Hence most people’s failure, and their eventual disillusionment with this exhilarating and spectacular sport.
If, however, you are lucky enough to have your attention momentarily distracted at the crucial moment by, say, a gorgeous pair of legs (tentacles, pseudopodia, according to phyllum and/or personal inclination) or a bomb going off in your vicinty, or by suddenly spotting an extremely rare species of beetle crawling along a nearby twig, then in your astonishment you will miss the ground completely and remain bobbing just a few inches above it in what might seem to be a slightly foolish manner.
This is a moment for superb and delicate concentration. Bob and float, float and bob. Ignore all consideration of your own weight simply let yourself waft higher. Do not listen to what anybody says to you at this point because they are unlikely to say anything helpful. They are most likely to say something along the lines of “Good God, you can’t possibly be flying!” It is vitally important not to believe them or they will suddenly be right.
Waft higher and higher. Try a few swoops, gentle ones at first, then drift above the treetops breathing regularly.
DO NOT WAVE AT ANYBODY.
When you have done this a few times you will find the moment of distraction rapidly easier and easier to achieve.
You will then learn all sorts of things about how to control your flight, your speed, your maneuverability, and the trick usually lies in not thinking too hard about whatever you want to do, but just allowing it to happen as if it were going to anyway.
You will also learn about how to land properly, which is something you will almost certainly screw up, and screw up badly, on your first attempt.
There are private clubs you can join which help you achieve the all-important moment of distraction. They hire people with surprising bodies or opinions to leap out from behind bushes and exhibit and/or explain them at the critical moments. Few genuine hitchhikers will be able to afford to join these clubs, but some may be able to get temporary employment at them.

This is a piece by Douglas Adams, Which I had to reblog. Utterly wonderful concept on flying: 

There is an art, it says, or rather, a knack to flying. The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss. Pick a nice day, [The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy] suggests, and try it.

The first part is easy. All it requires is simply the ability to throw yourself forward with all your weight, and the willingness not to mind that it’s going to hurt.

That is, it’s going to hurt if you fail to miss the ground. Most people fail to miss the ground, and if they are really trying properly, the likelihood is that they will fail to miss it fairly hard.

Clearly, it is the second part, the missing, which presents the difficulties.

One problem is that you have to miss the ground accidentally. It’s no good deliberately intending to miss the ground because you won’t. You have to have your attention suddenly distracted by something else when you’re halfway there, so that you are no longer thinking about falling, or about the ground, or about how much it’s going to hurt if you fail to miss it.

It is notoriously difficult to prize your attention away from these three things during the split second you have at your disposal. Hence most people’s failure, and their eventual disillusionment with this exhilarating and spectacular sport.

If, however, you are lucky enough to have your attention momentarily distracted at the crucial moment by, say, a gorgeous pair of legs (tentacles, pseudopodia, according to phyllum and/or personal inclination) or a bomb going off in your vicinty, or by suddenly spotting an extremely rare species of beetle crawling along a nearby twig, then in your astonishment you will miss the ground completely and remain bobbing just a few inches above it in what might seem to be a slightly foolish manner.

This is a moment for superb and delicate concentration. Bob and float, float and bob. Ignore all consideration of your own weight simply let yourself waft higher. Do not listen to what anybody says to you at this point because they are unlikely to say anything helpful. They are most likely to say something along the lines of “Good God, you can’t possibly be flying!” It is vitally important not to believe them or they will suddenly be right.

Waft higher and higher. Try a few swoops, gentle ones at first, then drift above the treetops breathing regularly.

DO NOT WAVE AT ANYBODY.

When you have done this a few times you will find the moment of distraction rapidly easier and easier to achieve.

You will then learn all sorts of things about how to control your flight, your speed, your maneuverability, and the trick usually lies in not thinking too hard about whatever you want to do, but just allowing it to happen as if it were going to anyway.

You will also learn about how to land properly, which is something you will almost certainly screw up, and screw up badly, on your first attempt.

There are private clubs you can join which help you achieve the all-important moment of distraction. They hire people with surprising bodies or opinions to leap out from behind bushes and exhibit and/or explain them at the critical moments. Few genuine hitchhikers will be able to afford to join these clubs, but some may be able to get temporary employment at them.


(Source: sufferagette-city)

this time next week, this is where I will be.
three day holiday in torquay with someone lovely.
I can’t wait.

this time next week, this is where I will be.

three day holiday in torquay with someone lovely.

I can’t wait.

(Source: athighvoltage, via electric-voltage)